Connect with us

Royal

How the Royals Teach Their Children to Behave So Well in Church

Published

on

To many, the idea of 10 small children serving as bridesmaids and page boys at a wedding sounds like a recipe for disaster. But Meghan Markle and Prince Harry went for it anyway — and everyone behaved just fine.

Prince George, 4, Princess Charlotte, 3, and their eight cohorts made up of several of the royal couple’s godchildren and friends’ children, managed to accompany Meghan down the aisle and sit through the near-hour-long ceremony without incident, as nary a candy wrapper was heard nor program dropped while millions of people watched. According to Myka Meier of Beaumont Etiquette, which was founded in Kensington and teaches courses on etiquette at The Plaza Hotel in New York City, that seemingly flawless behavior is the result of practice, practice, practice.

“Etiquette training for the royals starts as soon as they’re old enough to sit at a table,” Meier says. “They are raised having formal meals, going to formal events and practicing everything from voice levels to dressing appropriately to even, of course, how to curtsy and bow. The children in the wedding would have been very well prepared through rehearsals and even learned wedding specific behavior and protocol.”

REX/Shutterstock

Jewelry designer Claudia Bradby, who attended the wedding with her husband, ITN anchor Tom Bradby, told ITV that seeing the children walk down the aisle was a highlight of the already-exciting day: “They were very well practiced, they looked as if they were really enjoying it.”

Of course, we’re talking about royals, here, and they aren’t without some assistance. “They would have many royal aides and members of the royal family to assist and guide the children through the day,” Meier adds. “If there were any issues, they would have been seamlessly taken care of.”

Jane Barlow/Getty

While Meier isn’t aware of any specific tips or tricks taught to the royal children, she does offer this recommendation to moms in awe of George, Charlotte, and the like: “Generally, the best way to keep a child well behaved during a ceremony is by using positive reinforcement, and of course reward good behavior!”

That seemed to work out well for one of the children at the royal wedding. “One little girl was upset but being comforted by the promise of Peppa Pig and Smarties later,” Bradby said.

This article originally appeared on people.com 

Trending

© 2018 Trevor Decker News
About Trevor Decker News
Trevor Decker News is an independently owned and operated website covering the entertainment industry from a family-friendly and inspirational perspective. Trevor Decker News is dedicated to covering the best in television, film, and music that inspires and is appropriate for families. Trevor Decker News tries its best to work directly with media companies to provide exclusive and unique perspectives for television film and music campaigns.

Trevor Decker News wishes to thank all media organizations and other third-party sources who may not be credited in posts on this website for their support and trust in our ability to help reach the family and faith-based audiences.

If you have any questions please contact trevor@trevordecker.com